Sure, we know that Lord of the Rings, Hunger Games, and Harry Potter are modern examples of the Hero’s Journey, but there are a l-o-t of other popular films that also fit Joseph Campbell’s monomyth. A few that may surprise you: Continue reading

The man who created Roget’s Thesaurus, Peter Mark Roget, was born on January 18, 1779, a date loquacious scholars celebrate as National Thesaurus Day. (Thanks, Alex E., for the heads-up. I had no idea this was a thing.) Though my research failed to unearth the authority who had the power to make such a declaration, it seems like a nice thing to remember the retired doctor whose passion project helps us all sound a bit more erudite. Continue reading

Can you name the famous figures who faced the following?

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So…yeah…it’s been nearly four months since I changed out the bulletin board, but last week I visited the giant color printer at Media Services and you can follow along a video field trip Continue reading

When my freshmen strike these words from their literary analysis writing, they (miraculously!) start to sound like young adults. Continue reading

This week’s drop of awesome comes from Cam Milleson, the blog’s middle school teacher friend in Kernville, California. Cam’s kids are working on a suspense narrative, so she built the following progress-tracker Continue reading

Note: If you’re looking for the pre-winter break Reindeer Race, keep reading to see how these materials can easily be adapted for any holiday/upcoming school vacation.

Two years ago, I shared my P.E. department colleagues’ inspired use of stations on the day before we left for Thanksgiving break. Here’s the video, in case you missed it:

Today, I’m adapting their idea to bring some holiday fun to our English/Language Arts classes. Continue reading