Sure, we know that Lord of the Rings, Hunger Games, and Harry Potter are modern examples of the Hero’s Journey, but there are a l-o-t of other popular films that also fit Joseph Campbell’s monomyth. A few that may surprise you: Continue reading

The man who created Roget’s Thesaurus, Peter Mark Roget, was born on January 18, 1779, a date loquacious scholars celebrate as National Thesaurus Day. (Thanks, Alex E., for the heads-up. I had no idea this was a thing.) Though my research failed to unearth the authority who had the power to make such a declaration, it seems like a nice thing to remember the retired doctor whose passion project helps us all sound a bit more erudite. Continue reading

If you caught last night’s Golden Globes, you were treated to this heartstopper of a speech by Oprah Winfrey. If not, watch it now. I’ll wait. Continue reading

So…yeah…it’s been nearly four months since I changed out the bulletin board, but last week I visited the giant color printer at Media Services and you can follow along a video field trip Continue reading

When my freshmen strike these words from their literary analysis writing, they (miraculously!) start to sound like young adults. Continue reading

Note: If you’re looking for the pre-winter break Reindeer Race, keep reading to see how these materials can easily be adapted for any holiday/upcoming school vacation.

Two years ago, I shared my P.E. department colleagues’ inspired use of stations on the day before we left for Thanksgiving break. Here’s the video, in case you missed it:

Today, I’m adapting their idea to bring some holiday fun to our English/Language Arts classes. Continue reading

This week, I’m continuing the occasional “How to Write” series with a look at the power of an essay’s conclusion. English teacher friends, here is the three-sentence formula that often turns a B+ essay into an A- in my classroom: Continue reading