The pandemic is spreading quickly and it looks like my initial two-week Coronavirus lesson plan isn’t going to be enough. Since my brain’s default is worst-case-scenario mode, I’m now expecting all of our schools to cancel in-person instruction for the rest of the spring semester.

Will this actually happen? I have no idea. What does this mean for our students? Again, no idea. I’ve never taught in a 1:1 school and my online learning experience is limited to a couple of dismal professional development courses. Not fun. And, yet, fun is exactly what we need right now. Continue reading

Even the most reluctant students love creating “found” poems, also known as blackout poetry. All you’ll need to fill an entire class session is this Prezi (click here to download a FREE copy from my shop), dark markers or crayons, and a few newspaper pages or photocopies of a few pages from any novel you’re […]

Is there an English teacher out there who doesn’t love the 1989 Oscar-winning film Dead Poets Society? Doubtful. I first saw the film when I was high school senior (go ahead, do the math) and wanted to both marry Mr. Keating and be Mr. Keating. Well, I married Mr. Randazzo instead, but I’ve definitely added a healthy dose of Keatingness to my teaching style. Continue reading

Often, teens (and even some teachers I know) dread the study of poetry, complaining that it’s too stuffy, sappy, or difficult to understand. It’s true that some poems are intentionally obtuse or overly self-aware; others, though, are little nuggets of awesomeness for us to mentally savor. Continue reading